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Fossil Record A palaeontological open-access journal of the Museum für Naturkunde
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Volume 1, issue 1
Foss. Rec., 1, 151–165, 1998
https://doi.org/10.1002/mmng.19980010111
© Author(s) 1998. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Foss. Rec., 1, 151–165, 1998
https://doi.org/10.1002/mmng.19980010111
© Author(s) 1998. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  01 Jan 1998

01 Jan 1998

China's Beech Forests in the Pre-Quaternary

L. Yu-Sheng2,1, W. Wei-Ming2, and A. Momohara3 L. Yu-Sheng et al.
  • 1Museum of Natural History, Institute of Palaeontology, Invalidenstrasse 43, 10115 Berlin, Germany
  • 2Department of Palynology, Nanjing Institute of Geology & Palaeontology, Academia Sinica, Nanjing 210008, China
  • 3Department of Environmental Studies, Chiba University, 648 Matsudo, Matsudo City, Chiba, 271, Japan

Abstract. Fagus in China is never dominant in Late Cretaceous and Tertiary floras although it might reach its highest diversity in the Miocene. The genus Fagus was more widely distributed during the Palaeogene than in the Neogene. Furthermore, the ecological requirements of Fagus in the Palaeogene seem much broader than those in the Neogene onwards. This is because the Palaeogene floras containing Fagus lived in various conditions from an arid and hot climate to a humid and warm habitat. Additionally, Fagus then coexisted with many kinds of hygrophilous, thermophilous and xerophilous plants. However, the wide distribution, broad ecological adaptation and species composition changed greatly in the Neogene. The Neogene Fagus-containing floras are slightly more similar to the modern beech forests than the Palaeogene ones, although a big difference remains. Chinese fossil data document the post-Tertiary development of the modern beech forests.

doi:10.1002/mmng.19980010111

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