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Fossil Record A palaeontological open-access journal of the Museum für Naturkunde
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A new bioerosion trace fossil, the rosette-shaped microboring Neodendrina carnelia igen. et isp. n., is described from a giant clam (Tridacna maxima) discovered in Pleistocene to Holocene coral reef deposits of the Egyptian Red Sea coast. The trace was formed as a complex attachment scar after the host had ceased. The biological identity of the trace maker, probably either a benthic foraminiferan or a macrophyte, is discussed.
Articles | Volume 21, issue 1
Foss. Rec., 21, 1–9, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/fr-21-1-2018
Foss. Rec., 21, 1–9, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/fr-21-1-2018

Research article 10 Jan 2018

Research article | 10 Jan 2018

Large dendrinids meet giant clam: the bioerosion trace fossil Neodendrina carnelia igen. et isp. n. in a Tridacna shell from Pleistocene–Holocene coral reef deposits, Red Sea, Egypt

Max Wisshak and Christian Neumann

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Short summary
A new bioerosion trace fossil, the rosette-shaped microboring Neodendrina carnelia igen. et isp. n., is described from a giant clam (Tridacna maxima) discovered in Pleistocene to Holocene coral reef deposits of the Egyptian Red Sea coast. The trace was formed as a complex attachment scar after the host had ceased. The biological identity of the trace maker, probably either a benthic foraminiferan or a macrophyte, is discussed.
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