Articles | Volume 21, issue 2
Foss. Rec., 21, 301–310, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/fr-21-301-2018
Foss. Rec., 21, 301–310, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/fr-21-301-2018

Research article 13 Dec 2018

Research article | 13 Dec 2018

The skull of the carettochelyid turtle Anosteira pulchra from the Eocene (Uintan) of Wyoming and the carotid canal system of carettochelyid turtles

Walter G. Joyce et al.

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Cited articles

Albrecht, P. W.: The cranial arteries and cranial arterial foramina of the turtle genera Chrysemys, Sternotherus, and Trionyx: a comparative study with analysis of possible evolutionary implications, Tulane Stud. Zool., 14, 81–99, 1967. 
Albrecht, P. W.: The cranial arteries of turtles and their evolutionary significance, J. Morphol., 149, 159–182, 1976. 
Clark, J.: A new anosteirid from the Uinta Eocene, An. Carn. Mus. Nat. Hist., 21, 161–170, 1932. 
Danilov, I. G., Obraztsova, E. M., Chen, W., and Jin, J.: The cranial morphology of Anosteira maomingensis (Testudines, Pan-Carettochelys) and the evolution of pan-carettochelyid turtles, J. Vert. Paleontol., 37, e1335735, 1–13, 2017. 
Gaffney, E. S.: A phylogeny and classification of the higher categories of turtles, B. Am. Mus. Nat. Hist., 155, 387–436, 1975. 
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Pig-nosed turtles are an enigmatic group of reptiles with an extensive fossil record across the globe. The group is known to have inhabited North America during the Eocene, about 55 to 40 million years ago, but information is still limited regarding the exact morphology of these turtles, as remains are few. Here we document the morphology of the only known skull of a North American pig-nosed turtle based on a fossil from the middle Eocene Washakie Formation of Sweetwater County, Wyoming, USA.